The position is for 2 years starting 2018-01-01 or as agreed. Last day to apply is 2017-11-10.

Project description

The project concerns the mechanisms behind tree phenology, in particular aspen autumn leaf senescence. We approach this in several ways, for example studies on variation in collections of natural aspen genotypes (e. g. the SwAsp collection) grown in common gardens, which have their genomes sequenced allowing for Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) to identify candidate genes. The expression of the candidate genes can be modified and the resulting trees are studied in field experiments, we also use genome editing (CRISPR-Cas9) to change the sequences of the genes. We also study gene expression using RNAseq and investigate how plant hormones and other factors regulate the process with physiological approaches in the lab and in the field. The project is part of the KAW-financed initiative ”Understanding the environmental regulation of the annual growth cycle in trees”.

Tasks

You will analyse genomics data from aspen in relation to large field experiments, but also perform studies in the lab and greenhouse. The work is carried out together with the UPSC Bioinformatics platform, transformation platform, greenhouse and field staff and other persons involved. Significant amounts of data already exist.

The position is for 2 years starting 2018-01-01 or as agreed. Last day to apply is 2017-11-10.

Project description

The project concerns the mechanisms behind tree phenology, in particular aspen autumn leaf senescence. We approach this in several ways, for example studies on variation in collections of natural aspen genotypes (e. g. the SwAsp collection) grown in common gardens, which have their genomes sequenced allowing for Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) to identify candidate genes. The expression of the candidate genes can be modified and the resulting trees are studied in field experiments, we also use genome editing (CRISPR-Cas9) to change the sequences of the genes. We also study gene expression using RNAseq and investigate how plant hormones and other factors regulate the process with physiological approaches in the lab and in the field. The project is part of the KAW-financed initiative ”Understanding the environmental regulation of the annual growth cycle in trees”.

Tasks

You will work with aspens in greenhouse and in the field, plan and perform physiological and biochemical studies aiming at understanding the mechanisms behind autumn leaf senescence. The work will be performed in collaboration with the UPSC technical platforms and other persons in the project. Significant amounts of data already exist.

Molecular understanding of sugar mediated growth control
The overexpression of bZIP11, a transcription factor involved in the response to sugars, inhibits growth of Arabidopsis seedlings (Hanson et al., 2008). A transcriptomic approach has highlighted genes implicated in primary carbon metabolism as direct transcriptional targets of bZIP11 (Ma et al., 2011).

We recently showed that a mutation in these genes results in a partial to total rescue of the bZIP11 overexpression phenotype and therefore hypothesized that other mutations may as well result in the same rescue. To identify these mutants, an EMS mutagenesis has been performed on the bZIP11 overexpressing line suitable for a suppressor screen.

The aims of this project are to screen the M2 population deriving from this mutagenesis and to further characterize the mutants in physiological and molecular methodology.

Contact: Thomas Dobrenel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Johannes Hanson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)